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Adamle can be
heavy-duty starter
in understanding CTE

By George Castle
Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

Normally this is a post about baseball.

Today it's about humanity.

Mike Adamle tells about his battle with dementia in his WMAQ-TV interview with Peggy Kusinski

Mike Adamle tells about his battle with dementia in his WMAQ-TV interview with Peggy Kusinski

Like countless others, I have been moved and, well, shaken by Mike Adamle's story. The former Bear and now former sports anchor for three Chicago TV stations is living testimony to what it's like to suffer from dementia connected with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the progressive neurodegenerative killer of retired football players.

After getting over the initial jolt, I'm intensely proud of Adamle for detailing about life with CTE while he can still communicate about the affliction. Too many others, namely ex-Bears All-Pro Dave Duerson, were diagnosed after their deaths. Duerson was worst of all, a suicide. He intentionally shot himself in his heart so his brain could be preserved and studied for the effects of CTE.


STORY >>


 

Schwarber comeback:
One man's determination
combined with Cubs modernization


By George Castle, CBM Historian
Posted Monday, February 20th, 2017

Kyle Schwarber (left) with CBM historian George Castle as they discussed the former's amazing rehab from two serious left-knee injuries. Castle could attest to the efficiency of modern-day orthopedic surgery and rehab, throwing aside the cane less than a month after hip replacement surgery.

Kyle Schwarber (left) with CBM historian George Castle as they discussed the former's amazing rehab from two serious left-knee injuries. Castle could attest to the efficiency of modern-day orthopedic surgery and rehab, throwing aside the cane less than a month after hip replacement surgery.

(First in a two-part series about the re-emergence of Kyle Schwarber in the Cubs' world-championship universe.)

Kyle Schwarber offers up the comeback that never ends.

A smart, stout-hearted, hard-hitting former football player whose startling recovery from a devastating knee injury suffered in April 2016 almost overshadowed the World Series itself, Schwarber was cleared to catch as spring training got under way in Mesa, Ariz.

But a baseball analyst would advise Schwarber to forget about squatting behind the plate unless an emergency transpired. Just getting Schwarber up and running enough to swing a bat in five of the seven Fall Classic games was a near-medical miracle unto itself. His left-handed run-production bat potential is too precious right now to wear down from catching, Schwarber’s preferred defensive position coming out of Indiana University.

Cubs management is getting with the desired program, putting strict limits on how much Schwarber can get into a catcher's crouch. Let him simply become a competent left fielder, learn a leadoff hitter's nuances if Joe Maddon slots him at No. 1 and serve in the rarest of Cubs roles – a second southpaw-swinger with power adding to the more established Anthony Rizzo.
STORY >>

Bourjos' journey
to Sox roster

Savvy trades for
White Sox

Cubs welcomed
at White House



A multi-media celebration of Chicago’s own Double Duty Radcliffe

'Double Duty' Ted Radcliffe: Chicago's own Negro League superstar

Double Duty Ted Radcliffe was Chicago’s own Negro League superstar. Those who knew him and his work insist Duty would have been a star big-leaguer behind the plate and a very competent starting pitcher had the color line not been firmly entrenched in the prime of his career.

In connection with the DD Classic and as a permanent way to honor Duty, the Chicago Baseball Museum is presenting this special tribute to the great man and also assisted with the Double Duty exhibit at the DuSable Museum. On our 'Double Duty' microsite, we recount his long career with his own words, photos that show the ballplayer, the colorful personality and as a special treat, Duty’s own taped recollections from WGN-TV’s 1992 "Chicago American Giants" special.

STORY >>
Visit the 'Double Duty' microsite >>
Visit White Sox’ Double Duty Classic >>

Jack Brickhouse: Our man
for all sports seasons

Jack Brickhouse: Our man for all seasons

Jack Brickhouse enjoyed a life of firsts. He was the first voice heard on WGN-TV when it signed on 1948. He was the first Chicago voice heard on a trans-Atlantic satellite broadcast in 1962. He called eight no-hitters, six Gale Sayers touchdowns in one game and the better part of 45 runs scored in a 1979 Cubs-Phillies contest.

The Chicago Baseball Museum pays tribute to Brickhouse in this special Jack Brickhouse microsite at a time the Cubs are honoring him with a special bobblehead day, as part of their Wrigley Field 100th anniversary celebration. The website recalls different facets of Brickhouse’s life, including stories, photos from the collection of Pat Brickhouse, Jack’s wife, and a wide variety of video and audio highlights from his career.

STORY >>
Visit the Jack Brickhouse microsite >>
Chicago Tribune: Cubs will honor
Jack Brickhouse Friday >>


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